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Closed Captions - HDTV/Netcast/webOS 1.0/webOS 2.0

Operation Commercial TVs, Healthcare TVs, Hospitality TVs, TVs Last Updated 01/28/2016
Closed Captions - TV

If a cable or satellite box is in use, the caption options in the TV may be inactive based on how the set-top box is connected to the TV. If this is the case, captions will need to be activated in the menu of your cable or satellite box.

Note: Most remote controls have a Closed Caption (CC) button on them for quick access.

Depending upon the model of your LG TV, the home screen may look different depending upon the operating system platform.


  1. With the home screen still open, click the Settings  icon near the top-right.
  2. On the left side of the menu, locate and click the Accessibility Settings accessibility icon.
  3. Click on Closed Caption.
  4. Set Closed Caption to On, then choose your analog/digital caption types.

    Note: CC1 (analog), Service1 (digital), and T1 (supporting text) are the most common options for English speaking viewers watching programs in the US.

  5. Digital Option will allow you to customize the appearence of the captions (color, size, etc.).
    Options include:
    • Note: A preview will appear on the right to show how the changes will look.

      • Style - Sets whether programs control the style or custom settings are used.
      • Size - Sets the text size.
      • Font - Sets the font style.
      • Text Color - Sets the text color.
      • Text Opacity - Sets the transparency of the text.
      • BG Color - Sets the background color.
      • BG Opacity - Sets the transparency of the background.
      • Edge Type - Sets the edge type of the box containing the text.
      • Edge Color - Sets the edge color of the box containing the text.
      • Window Color - Sets the color of the window containing the text box.
      • Window Opacity - Sets the transparency of the window containing the text box.

Closed Captions (CC) are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for analog and digital TV. Most programming is required to provide closed caption information embedded in the TV signal, though there are currently two exemptions.

Note: If you are experiencing issues where some programs display closed captions, but other don't, please refer to fcc.gov/guides/closed-captioning for specific rules and exemptions.

Note: The FCC does not regulate captioning of home videos, DVDs, or video games.


Closed Captions exist over several channels, embedded within the broadcast signal. This means that the television station broadcasting your program is responsible for sending the captions as well. The TV or Set-Top Box then decodes the caption information and displays the text, if CC is enabled.

The embedded signal is divided into two Fields, each consisting of multiple channels. Each field contains two synchronized caption channels (CC or Service), two caption related text channels (includes information such as web site URLs), and an additional channel for Extended Data Services (XDS) within Field 2 only.


Caption channels are managed by the signal provider, but are intended to be used as follows:

  • CC1: - Contains primary language subtitles, meaning the language of the text will match the spoken language.
  • CC2: - Contains little, if any, information. CC1 and CC2 share bandwidth, and CC1 uses most of it, leaving little available space in CC2. Some broadcasters still use this channel for seconday languages, but it is no longer common, or suggested by the FCC, to do so.
  • CC3: - Contains secondary (and sometimes tertiary) language subtitles, meaning the language of the text will not match the spoken language. The seconday language is presented at the discretion of the broadcaster. CC3 is recommended for use as the bilingual channel by the FCC.
  • CC4: - Contains little, if any, information. CC3 and CC4 share bandwidth, and CC3 uses most of it, leaving little available space in CC4.
  • T1-4: - Caption related text associated with CC1-4 / Service1-4.
  • Service 1-4: - Newer digital and high-definition televisions have begun to use Service in place of CC for labelling. Service 1 will contain the same data as CC1, but may only be available during high-definition broadcasts (with CC available during standard definition broadcasts).


References:

  1. With the home screen still open, click the Settings  icon near the top-right.
  2. Click the Advanced advanced settings icon at the bottom.
  3. On the left side of the menu, locate and click the Accessibility Settings accessibility icon.
  4. Click on Closed Caption.
  5. Set Closed Caption to On, then choose your analog/digital caption types.

    Note: CC1 (analog), Service1 (digital), and T1 (supporting text) are the most common options for English speaking viewers watching programs in the US.

  6. Digital Option will allow you to customize the appearence of the captions (color, size, etc.).
    Options include:
    • Note: A preview will appear on the right to show how the changes will look.

      • Style - Sets whether programs control the style or custom settings are used.
      • Size - Sets the text size.
      • Font - Sets the font style.
      • Text Color - Sets the text color.
      • Text Opacity - Sets the transparency of the text.
      • BG Color - Sets the background color.
      • BG Opacity - Sets the transparency of the background.
      • Edge Type - Sets the edge type of the box containing the text.
      • Edge Color - Sets the edge color of the box containing the text.
      • Window Color - Sets the color of the window containing the text box.
      • Window Opacity - Sets the transparency of the window containing the text box.

Closed Captions (CC) are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for analog and digital TV. Most programming is required to provide closed caption information embedded in the TV signal, though there are currently two exemptions.

Note: If you are experiencing issues where some programs display closed captions, but other don't, please refer to fcc.gov/guides/closed-captioning for specific rules and exemptions.

Note: The FCC does not regulate captioning of home videos, DVDs, or video games.


Closed Captions exist over several channels, embedded within the broadcast signal. This means that the television station broadcasting your program is responsible for sending the captions as well. The TV or Set-Top Box then decodes the caption information and displays the text, if CC is enabled.

The embedded signal is divided into two Fields, each consisting of multiple channels. Each field contains two synchronized caption channels (CC or Service), two caption related text channels (includes information such as web site URLs), and an additional channel for Extended Data Services (XDS) within Field 2 only.


Caption channels are managed by the signal provider, but are intended to be used as follows:

  • CC1: - Contains primary language subtitles, meaning the language of the text will match the spoken language.
  • CC2: - Contains little, if any, information. CC1 and CC2 share bandwidth, and CC1 uses most of it, leaving little available space in CC2. Some broadcasters still use this channel for seconday languages, but it is no longer common, or suggested by the FCC, to do so.
  • CC3: - Contains secondary (and sometimes tertiary) language subtitles, meaning the language of the text will not match the spoken language. The seconday language is presented at the discretion of the broadcaster. CC3 is recommended for use as the bilingual channel by the FCC.
  • CC4: - Contains little, if any, information. CC3 and CC4 share bandwidth, and CC3 uses most of it, leaving little available space in CC4.
  • T1-4: - Caption related text associated with CC1-4 / Service1-4.
  • Service 1-4: - Newer digital and high-definition televisions have begun to use Service in place of CC for labelling. Service 1 will contain the same data as CC1, but may only be available during high-definition broadcasts (with CC available during standard definition broadcasts).


References:

  1. With the home screen still open, click the Settings  icon near the bottom-left.
  2. On the left side of the menu, locate and click the Option netcast icon.
  3. Click on Caption and move the top slider to On.
  4. In the Mode section, select the type of captions you wish to view.

    Note: CC1 (analog), Service1 (digital), and T1 (supporting text) are the most common options for English speaking viewers watching programs in the US.

  5. Digital Option will allow you to customize the appearence of the captions (color, size, etc.).
    • Note: A preview will appear on the right to show how the changes will look.

      • Style - Sets whether programs control the style or custom settings are used.
      • Size - Sets the text size.
      • Font - Sets the font style.
      • Text Color - Sets the text color.
      • Text Opacity - Sets the transparency of the text.
      • BG Color - Sets the background color.
      • BG Opacity - Sets the transparency of the background.
      • Edge Type - Sets the edge type of the box containing the text.
      • Edge Color - Sets the edge color of the box containing the text.
      • Window Color - Sets the color of the window containing the text box.
      • Window Opacity - Sets the transparency of the window containing the text box.

Closed Captions (CC) are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for analog and digital TV. Most programming is required to provide closed caption information embedded in the TV signal, though there are currently two exemptions.

Note: If you are experiencing issues where some programs display closed captions, but other don't, please refer to fcc.gov/guides/closed-captioning for specific rules and exemptions.

Note: The FCC does not regulate captioning of home videos, DVDs, or video games.


Closed Captions exist over several channels, embedded within the broadcast signal. This means that the television station broadcasting your program is responsible for sending the captions as well. The TV or Set-Top Box then decodes the caption information and displays the text, if CC is enabled.

The embedded signal is divided into two Fields, each consisting of multiple channels. Each field contains two synchronized caption channels (CC or Service), two caption related text channels (includes information such as web site URLs), and an additional channel for Extended Data Services (XDS) within Field 2 only.


Caption channels are managed by the signal provider, but are intended to be used as follows:

  • CC1: - Contains primary language subtitles, meaning the language of the text will match the spoken language.
  • CC2: - Contains little, if any, information. CC1 and CC2 share bandwidth, and CC1 uses most of it, leaving little available space in CC2. Some broadcasters still use this channel for seconday languages, but it is no longer common, or suggested by the FCC, to do so.
  • CC3: - Contains secondary (and sometimes tertiary) language subtitles, meaning the language of the text will not match the spoken language. The seconday language is presented at the discretion of the broadcaster. CC3 is recommended for use as the bilingual channel by the FCC.
  • CC4: - Contains little, if any, information. CC3 and CC4 share bandwidth, and CC3 uses most of it, leaving little available space in CC4.
  • T1-4: - Caption related text associated with CC1-4 / Service1-4.
  • Service 1-4: - Newer digital and high-definition televisions have begun to use Service in place of CC for labelling. Service 1 will contain the same data as CC1, but may only be available during high-definition broadcasts (with CC available during standard definition broadcasts).


References:

  1. Press the Settings button on your remote.
  2. Choose the Option netcast menu.
  3. In the Caption section, move the slider to adjust the chosen options.

    Note: CC1 (analog), Service1 (digital), and T1 (supporting text) are the most common options for English speaking viewers watching programs in the US.

Closed Captions (CC) are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for analog and digital TV. Most programming is required to provide closed caption information embedded in the TV signal, though there are currently two exemptions.

Note: If you are experiencing issues where some programs display closed captions, but other don't, please refer to fcc.gov/guides/closed-captioning for specific rules and exemptions.

Note: The FCC does not regulate captioning of home videos, DVDs, or video games.


Closed Captions exist over several channels, embedded within the broadcast signal. This means that the television station broadcasting your program is responsible for sending the captions as well. The TV or Set-Top Box then decodes the caption information and displays the text, if CC is enabled.

The embedded signal is divided into two Fields, each consisting of multiple channels. Each field contains two synchronized caption channels (CC or Service), two caption related text channels (includes information such as web site URLs), and an additional channel for Extended Data Services (XDS) within Field 2 only.


Caption channels are managed by the signal provider, but are intended to be used as follows:

  • CC1: - Contains primary language subtitles, meaning the language of the text will match the spoken language.
  • CC2: - Contains little, if any, information. CC1 and CC2 share bandwidth, and CC1 uses most of it, leaving little available space in CC2. Some broadcasters still use this channel for seconday languages, but it is no longer common, or suggested by the FCC, to do so.
  • CC3: - Contains secondary (and sometimes tertiary) language subtitles, meaning the language of the text will not match the spoken language. The seconday language is presented at the discretion of the broadcaster. CC3 is recommended for use as the bilingual channel by the FCC.
  • CC4: - Contains little, if any, information. CC3 and CC4 share bandwidth, and CC3 uses most of it, leaving little available space in CC4.
  • T1-4: - Caption related text associated with CC1-4 / Service1-4.
  • Service 1-4: - Newer digital and high-definition televisions have begun to use Service in place of CC for labelling. Service 1 will contain the same data as CC1, but may only be available during high-definition broadcasts (with CC available during standard definition broadcasts).


References:

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